Hamp & Doc

“Doc” Skinner and the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival

by Dr. Lynn J. "Doc" Skinner, as told to Alan Jay Solan

Hamp & Doc is packed with previously unheard stories about some of the biggest names in jazz (Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Hank Jones, and many more), rare photos from Skinner’s personal collection, a behind-the-scenes look at his thirty-one years directing the festival, and inspiring anecdotes about his early life as a musical prodigy growing up in a loving Mormon family in southern Idaho. But most of all, Hamp & Doc is a celebration.

Read more » Buy Now

To know Lynn “Doc” Skinner, is to love him. How could one not love a man whose infectious enthusiasm has inspired thousands of students, teachers, and audiences alike to expand their knowledge and understanding of jazz?

Dee Daniels

At a Glance

Title
Hamp & Doc
Subtitle
“Doc” Skinner and the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival
Author
Dr. Lynn J. "Doc" Skinner, as told to Alan Jay Solan

Publisher

6750 SW Franklin St, Ste. A
Portland, OR 97223-2542
Phone: (503) 968-6777
Fax: (503) 968-6779

Formats

Paperback

ISBN
978-1-62901-586-6
Price
$24.95
Page Count
184
Trim Size
6″ × 9″

Hardcover

ISBN
978-1-62901-587-3
Price
$32.95
Page Count
184
Trim Size
6″ × 9″

Kindle

ISBN
978-1-62901-587-3
Price
$4.99

If ever I met an angel, it’s Doc Skinner.

Benny Green

About the Book

Music and magic came together in Moscow, Idaho when jazz legend Lionel Hampton fell in love with music educator Lynn “Doc” Skinner’s idea: let students from remote areas of the country come to the University of Idaho’s jazz festival and learn directly from the greats.

With only that dream, the two men went on to grow what had been a modest annual event into a world-class celebration of music, education, love, and life—developing a deep and profound friendship. That accomplishment is at the heart of Hamp & Doc: “Doc” Skinner and the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival—Skinner’s memoir, as told to Alan Solan, former arts and entertainment editor at the Moscow-Pullman Daily News, who covered the festival for many years.

Hamp & Doc is packed with previously unheard stories about some of the biggest names in jazz (Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Hank Jones, and many more), rare photos from Skinner’s personal collection, a behind-the-scenes look at his thirty-one years directing the festival, and inspiring anecdotes about his early life as a musical prodigy growing up in a loving Mormon family in southern Idaho. But most of all, Hamp & Doc is a celebration. Skinner and Hampton created an unforgettable experience for hundreds of thousands of students, many of whom went on to become renowned musicians in their own right. At last, there is a fitting testament to this incredible legacy.

The Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in Moscow, Idaho, has been one of the most important events in the history of jazz for its musicality and amazing scope. Hundreds of significant jazz musicians have appeared there. Thanks to Lynn 'Doc' Skinner, its creator, director, 'chief arranger' and inspiration to the next generation, the festival is still vibrantly in existence.

Claudio Roditi

Excerpt

Chapter 16 A Tribute to Jazz Itself

Sarah Vaughan was very proud of the festival being named in honor of her friend. She wanted to come back one more time to perform with Hamp, but she had cancer. I talked to her manager, and he was very kind, but he told me Sarah was not strong enough to perform. Later, I was told Sarah’s last words were, “I just wanted to perform once more with Hamp at his jazz festival in Idaho.”

In the coming years, Hamp would call me at home—sometimes at two thirty or three in the morning—full of excitement and energy, bursting with ideas about the festival and performers he wanted to bring in. It was amazing to see how he was so connected to the whole jazz network.

When the festival was named for Lionel Hampton, the jazz world and jazz artists felt that for someone to finally name a festival for a jazz artist was not just a tribute to Lionel Hampton—it was a tribute to jazz itself. For a university to have a festival named for a jazz artist was a big-time change. When I was going to school at Utah State University in the late 1950s and early 1960s, it was almost like jazz had a bad name. In those days, a lot of us learned about jazz by playing and listening to it together. You couldn’t even take a class in it. You could do the jazz band, but couldn’t get credit for it. You tried out, you were in it, but there was no credit. So what we did at the University of Idaho was really a major change in how people looked at jazz education and the importance of jazz.

To students, I think the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival says this music is valuable enough that a place has been created where the greatest artists in the world come to help make a difference in the lives of young musicians. The festival changed the lives of thousands and thousands of people. The students who came to the festival started to understand music’s power to elevate the soul to new heights—a power that we don’t even understand. That was Hamp’s life. It is my life. That’s why I think we had such an incredible friendship. We both understood the power of music. We loved the music, and we loved the people who created it.

Hamp took an active role in the festival right from the start, and the list of artists he introduced to the festival over the years is astounding: Ray Brown, Milt Hinton, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Ernestine Anderson, Betty Carter, Jon Faddis, Wynton Marsalis, Branford Marsalis, Carmen McRae, Benny Golson, Art Farmer, Al Grey, Pete and Conte Candoli, Terence Blanchard, Clark Terry, Wallace Roney, Freddie Hubbard, Tommy Flanagan, Kenny Barron, Cedar Walton, George Mraz, and many, many more.

The student competitions and the artist’s workshops expanded and took on new meaning. Later, our Jazz in the Schools program began introducing world-class jazz to elementary school students throughout the region. Hamp also took an active role in developing scholarships to the university’s music school.

Hamp and I talked frequently—often about the festival, but as we became friends, we also discussed our families, lives, and hopes. His passion for education—for developing talent in others—kept coming through.

Review

You don’t have to be a musician or even a music enthusiast to thoroughly enjoy this book. Everyone should read Hamp & Doc, if even just to learn the impressive fact that a small city in Idaho is home to one of the biggest jazz festivals in the world. Solan’s writing is highly accessible and engaging—he seamlessly weaves together Skinner’s memories spanning his more than thirty years as festival director. Hamp & Doc gives a behind-the-scenes look at Skinner’s experience at the helm of such a successful music event and, in the process, readers will witness the birth of a deep friendship built on a shared vision. Skinner and Hampton are a dynamic duo, and evidence that great things are born from an unwavering commitment to one’s passions and from working together.

Red City Review Read the Full Review

About the Author

Lynn J. “Doc” Skinner was born in Nounan, Idaho, in 1940. After earning his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in music from Utah State University, he was director of music for the Rexburg-Madison (Idaho) School District for nine years. In 1971, he was hired as a music professor at the University of Idaho in Moscow, and in 1976, he took over the university’s jazz festival, which was renamed the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in 1985. Under Skinner’s leadership, and with the support of Hampton, the festival experienced unprecedented growth for decades. In 2007, the year Skinner retired as executive director, the festival was awarded the National Medal of Arts, making it the first and only festival to receive the honor. Skinner lives in Moscow, Idaho, with his wife Pamela.

Buy Now